Tag Archive | good samaritan

Good Samaritan Helps Girl, 7, Reunite with Stolen Dog


By REBECCA HARSHBARGER and KEVIN SHEEHAN

Mia Bendrat with Marleyphoto credit: Robert Miller

Mia Bendrat with Marley
photo credit: Robert Miller

A 7-year-old girl got the best present ever yesterday — she was reunited with her best friend, who’d been dognapped by a cold-hearted thief the day before.

“I couldn’t sleep last night without Marley smiling,” Mia Bendrat said of her little pal, a Cavalier King Charles spaniel stolen from in front of a Washington Heights grocery.

Her relieved mom, Angie Estrada, said, “It’s a Christmas miracle. Oh, yes!”

The hero of the holiday story is good Samaritan Tena Cohen, who was headed to the Greenmarket in Union Square at about 1:30 p.m. Monday when she heard a man yelling, “Dog for sale!”

“It looked nervous and sad, and was kind of an older dog,” Cohen said. “I figured it was stolen.’’

She offered to buy the pooch.

“I said I had $100. He said the guy who owns it wants more” and pointed to a man, Cohen recalled.

The supposed “owner’’ was “very stoned, on drugs,” said Cohen, who teaches Spanish at Brooklyn Tech HS. “He said he paid $3,200 for the dog, and had it for years.”

SAVIOR: Tena Cohen (above) paid $220 out of her own pocket to reunite Mia Bendrat with Marley. photo credit: Robert Miller

SAVIOR: Tena Cohen (above) paid $220 out of her own pocket to reunite Mia Bendrat with Marley.
photo credit: Robert Miller

Cohen then walked into a nearby Staples and made three debit-card purchases totaling $220.

Then she returned them for cash and went back to negotiate.

“I said, ‘Look, this is all the money I have,’ ” Cohen said. “He gave me the dog. I gave him the money.”

She took Marley to a vet and also called cops. Both men were gone by the time police arrived. But last night they picked up 29-year-old Brad Bacon, of Washington Heights, and charged him with grand larceny and criminal possession of stolen property.

The vet checked out the dog for free and held him overnight. Cohen called a group called Cavalier Rescue USA.

Its president, Carolyn Stigler, remembered the story about Marley in yesterday’s Post.

Stigler contacted the vet, who called the Post reporter. She arranged for the dog to be taken to Mia’s family, to see if it was Marley. It was.

“This was my daughter’s Christmas wish,” said Estrada.

Until then, the family had been devastated.

“It was so sad,” Estrada added. “She sat in Marley’s nook and refused to dress up the tree.”

The happy ending came just in time.

“I can’t believe a grinch would steal our Marley,” Estrada said. “But the grinch didn’t win.’’

Mia chimed in, “I’m not going to let Marley go now, no matter what!”

source: http://www.nypost.com/p/news/local/christmas_presence_nY7U8iTpeKUGlUDSk62z1K

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Suburban Chicago Man, Who Helped With Post-Sandy Cleanup In NJ, Wins $100,000 Lottery Prize


NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — While most people are frustrated by the problems created by Superstorm Sandy, one volunteer had an unexpected windfall.

He hit the lottery jackpot because he came to serve in the storm.

John Turner is now back home in the southern Chicago suburb of Chicago Heights, but he’ll never forget what he saw on the East Coast.

“We saw houses moved down the streets, vehicles turned over,” Turner told CBS 2′s Kristine Johnson.

The 38-year-old Turner runs a water removal business called National Catastrophe Solutions of Chicago. He and his staff cleaned up homes flooded by Superstorm Sandy, including some for free for homeowners who had lost everything.

“Some people didn’t have insurance coverage. Some people never would have expected this. It’s one of those 100 years deals,” Turner said.

It was last Sunday after a hard day of cleanup that Turner bought a New Jersey lottery scratch-off ticket. With a flick of the wrist, he became $100,000 richer.

Turner said he was in utter shock.

“Like this is not happening. Like this is not real,” Turner said.

“He couldn’t believe it. He wanted a lot of confirmation from us and just called a lot of family and told everybody the good news,” Joshua Rivera, one of Turner’s employees, said.

In a statement, the state’s lottery director said: “We are very grateful that John has given his time and skills to help the people dealing with the challenges brought on by Sandy and that New Jersey is giving a memorable thank you back to him.”

The jackpot, after taxes, comes to about $70,000, which Turner hopes to invest in his business, give to his church and donate to a family that is in need.

“He deserves it. He’s a good-hearted man. I couldn’t think of anybody better to win it than John,” Rivera said.

Turner, who was born in New Jersey, said his thoughts are still with those struggling after Sandy.

“It’s a saddening situation. It’s really, really sad. So we hope they get back to normal as quickly as possible,” Turner said.

Turner said he will be back to the Tri-State Area next week to once again help in the recovery effort.

source: http://newyork.cbslocal.com/2012/11/12/chicago-man-who-helped-with-post-sandy-cleanup-in-nj-wins-100000-lottery-prize/

Ohio Man Aids Same Stranger Twice in Eight Years


By Matthew Jaffe | Good Morning America

In a turn of events described as “miraculous,” an Ohio man helped the same stranger twice in the span of eight years, most recently in a potentially deadly situation last weekend.

It was late Saturday night on a country road near Chagrin Falls, about 20 miles east of Cleveland, when Christopher Manacci and his wife were driving home from watching their son’s football game for Case Western Reserve University and noticed a van, towing a boat, moving very slowly.

“I passed him and, for whatever reason, I noticed his front-left tire looked flat,” Manacci told ABC News. “I dropped my wife off at home and said, “I’m going to take the guy a can of Fix-a-Flat. It’s 11 o’clock at night in a rural setting, so there’s not a lot of places to go. There are no tire stores, no anything. When I returned, I pulled behind him about 100 feet away, completely off the road and went up to ask him if he wanted to use the Fix-a-Flat for his tire, which I noticed was shredded. He and his son were outside the van evaluating the tire.”

Suddenly, a pick-up truck, whose driver turned out to be allegedly drunk, came tearing down the road, smashing into Manacci’s car.

“We didn’t even see this truck until it impacted the car,” Manacci recalled. “It strikes my vehicle and causes the truck to go up on the left two wheels, airborne, missing this guy and his son by about three feet.

“The guy looks at me and goes, ‘What just happened?’ I just said, ‘Thank God he hit my car.’ Because had he not struck my vehicle, he would have struck this guy and his son head-on at 50 miles per hour.”

That was when a strange situation became even stranger. Gerald Gronowski, the owner of the van who was returning from a lake fishing trip, asked Manacci what kind of work he did. When Manacci replied that he is a nurse practitioner at Case Western’s School of Nursing, Gronowski recounted an incident that had taken place eight years earlier.

“He tells me about this story where he was fishing on that same lake,” Manacci said. “His son at that time was on the dock where you launch the boats and I heard him say, ‘Is anybody here a doctor?’ I was kayaking with my son on the lake. His son says, ‘My dad’s hurt really bad.’ I say, ‘Let me take a look at him.’ He had three [fishing hooks] hooks deep in the palm of his hand, deep into the tissue of his hand. Fortunately, I had with me a medical kit to remove this hook out of his hand without causing any more extensive damage.

“He’s telling me this story and I go, ‘Yes, I know that story well.’ He looks at me and says, ‘You do?’ I say, ‘Yeah, it was me. He says, ‘Oh, my God, it was you!’

He thanked me for that last time and says, ‘You know, there’s no doubt, tonight you saved my life.’ I said, ‘I didn’t, but I guess my Lexus did.'”

The remote chances of Manacci helping Gronowski twice in eight years were not lost on the two men.

“To have this perchance meeting a second time when he was in significant danger and for me to play a small role in the outcome, it’s a blessing,” Manacci said.

“I’m a nurse practitioner and in 30 years I’ve done helicopter rescues and jet rescues in every place across the globe, so coming to help people is part of my DNA , I guess,” he said. “Of all these things, I probably know the least about mechanics, but I do know when somebody’s in trouble and that was the sense I had [Saturday].

“It’s really quite a miracle if you think about it, a miracle that I was a part of,” he said. “And it’s a miracle for that [alleged] drunk driver since he does not have to live with the horror of knowing that he killed a family. No matter how you look at it, it’s really quite amazing. For me, well, you know, I’m just a small piece of it.”

As the two men stood by the side of the road Saturday in disbelief about what had just transpired, Gronowski offered to take Manacci fishing to thank him for his help.

“I said, ‘No disrespect, but given the luck you have surrounding the fishing,” Manacci said he replied, “It’d be better off if we went bowling.

“And I said, ‘I want to be clear that I limit rescues to two times per person in a lifetime.”

source: http://gma.yahoo.com/ohio-man-aids-same-stranger-twice-eight-years-214414472.html?_esi=1

I have received many responses to many of the posts on this blog, thus far. However, may I request that you please reply in the comment section of the blog  – as opposed to on Twitter, Facebook, emails, etc. – so that all responses will be together. Your comment may be helpful to others who come across something that they can relate to. You can comment anonymously.

Thank you and many blessings.